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We as a country have recently begun the difficult and important conversation about social mobility and intergenerational wealth. A related—though less discussed—problem is that of intergenerational health. It is increasingly clear that our health is powerfully shaped by our own early childhood experiences, as well as by the struggles and triumphs of our parents and grandparents.

This process begins in the womb—and oftentimes before.

The Affordable Care Act insurance reforms seek to expand coverage and to improve the affordability of care and premiums. Before the implementation of the major reforms, data from U.S. census surveys indicated nearly 32 million insured people under age 65 were in households spending a high share of their income on medical care. Adding these “underinsured” people to the estimated 47.3 million uninsured, the state share of the population at risk for not being able to afford care ranged from 14 percent in Massachusetts to 36 percent to 38 percent in Idaho, Florida, Nevada, New Mexico, and Texas. Nationally, more than half of people with low incomes and 20 percent of those with middle incomes were either underinsured or uninsured in 2012. The report provides state baselines to assess changes in coverage and affordability and compare states as insurance expansions and market reforms are implemented.

Seven patients injected with corticosteroids from a Tennessee compounding pharmacy have fallen ill, including at least one case of apparent fungal infection, the FDA said. The agency said it was working with the CDC and authorities in Tennessee to investigate the adverse events, linked to methylprednisolone acetate compounded by Main Street Family Pharmacy in Newbern, Tenn.

"Clinical information about these patients is pending; at least one of these infections appears to be fungal in nature," an FDA statement said.

Here's a simple infographic that breaks down how health care reform works, the philosophy of guaranteed-issue policies and how much health care reform costs.

Ever wonder what life was like 100 years ago? Taking a look at the quality of people’s health in the 20th century may renew your appreciate for life. In 1900, the life expectancy for women was 48 and for men it was 46. Today, women can expect to live to 80 and men to 75. So what really changed between then and now? A whole host of things, but we’ve listed some of the biggies. This infographic takes a look at a few ways that health and medicine have improved since the last century.